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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am interested in feedback concerning Austin and Halleck ML rifles. I know they are out of business but I have always thought thet were a quality product. They have 26" barrels and #11 cap so I would want to convert if possible. I'm considering a purchase soon and would appreciate opinions. Do you know if 209 conversions are available or not?
 

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Sorry Hm. I don't have anything to offer all I can recall is they were good quality available and I don't even know if there's a 209 conversion available.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks BB. FG at least they put quality tiger maple on their stocks. I'm just a wood kind of guy. Beauty is in the eye of the beholder especially in guns. I suspose that's another reason I like the older TC rifles they had nice wood on them. Anyway if I can get the A&H for a good price I'll add it to the collection just because.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
unlike that other maker that mostly put cheap hardwoods, a few cheap walnut, or plastic stocks on their rifles. Don't get me wrong the A&H has some of the best wood for a production rifle of them all, running close to standard Hatfields. While good wood won't make then more accurate is does look better and in my most humble opinion makes them more valueable for resale down the road. Also, generally makes them a tad bit heavier. Nothing makes a rifle stand out from the standard crowd than high quality wood with lots of grain and figure. Quality wood separates each rifle and makes it a one of the kind piece as no two can be exactly alike. To me that makes wood the more desirable product. Yes I do have plastics, laminates but the one to compare to is the handmade Hawken with the tiger stripe maple not the black stocked one. Each has a purpose but for pure love of guns quality wood stocks make the difference. :ibtl:
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Because something could happen stops you from owning a quality piece of craftsmanship, FG even for you that's pretty shallow. The only gun I've hurt was after a slip on an ice covered stream edge in PA and fell breaking the stock on the Rem 760. I simply called Rem and purchased a new 7600 set for it. Those black stocks have a purpose but no personality and they all look alike, very generic,plain, simple, nothing that separates them form the next one. I know if you scratch one you may not cry as long but it's still a scratch. Come-on admit it a nice fancy wood stock on your favorite ML would be the ticket! I'm not talking about those CVA mountain rifle stocks either :w00t:
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I was talking about having nice wood stock and you said what if you broke it. I don't worry about breaking guns as it only happened one time in 45 years of hunting, and shooting that's pretty good odds. The A&H rifles still pull pretty good money so there are some who say there is quality. I said before that I liked their mountain rifle and wanted one in flint, right now a percussion one is available as well as a nice bolt rifle. I would like to get one of them.
 

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unlike that other maker that mostly put cheap hardwoods, a few cheap walnut, or plastic stocks on their rifles. Don't get me wrong the A&H has some of the best wood for a production rifle of them all, running close to standard Hatfields. While good wood won't make then more accurate is does look better and in my most humble opinion makes them more valueable for resale down the road. Also, generally makes them a tad bit heavier. Nothing makes a rifle stand out from the standard crowd than high quality wood with lots of grain and figure. Quality wood separates each rifle and makes it a one of the kind piece as no two can be exactly alike. To me that makes wood the more desirable product. Yes I do have plastics, laminates but the one to compare to is the handmade Hawken with the tiger stripe maple not the black stocked one. Each has a purpose but for pure love of guns quality wood stocks make the difference. :ibtl:
You don't have to tell me the value of nice would. I love curly maple.

I've just never seen anything i'd call nice on a TC gun.
 

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back in the old days TC used to use some really darn nice walnut on the hawken rifles. Supposedly they had a fire and lost their stock maker and after that, the wood patterns really stunk.

Lyman still puts out a good pattern english walnut stock on their guns but often times their factory finish just hides the beauty thats under the stain.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
You guys drive me nuts. I hope CVA is providing you with quality retirements for all the bs that spread around because it's getting pretty deep. I'll post a side by side comparision photo of the CVA mountain rifle and the TC PA hunter and take a vote by all as which one wins the best looking rifle award. I can see two votes for the CVA maybe.
 

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and in that comparison if the cva gets even 2 votes at least one of those votes would be a sympathy vote. :w00t:

trying to compare the quality of materials used to manufacture a Thompson Center rifle to a CVA is like a Corvette (the TC) racing a VW Bug (the cva).

like Foxworthy would say "If you think your cva muzzleloader is as NICE as a Thompson Center Rifle, you might be a *******. :lol::lol:
 
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