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This is going to sound strange but try it....

After you get your rifle from the store it will probibly be bore sighted. That is pretty worthless in my opinion. I always bore sight it myself by removing the bolt on a bolt action and centering both the bore and the cross hairs at 25 yards. Afterwards fire two shots at 25 yards, then adjust your scope to the exact center of the bull. Remember a 1 inch adjustment at 25 yards requires a 4 inch adjustment on the turrets. The turrets are calibrated for 100 yards changes. After you get your rifle dialed in at 25 yards drop back to 50 yards and rezero the rifle. Your adjustments will again not match the turrets, a 1 inch change at 50 yards is a 2 inch adjustment on the turrets. After this point ask yourself what is the range I can expect to shoot my Whitetail at. Is your area very woody, or mainly open spaces? I think most hunters are better off to have a rifle dead on at 100 yards. The old rule of 2 to 3 inches high at a 100 yards helped me miss an Elk on my first shot 20 years ago. After you zero your rifle at say 100 yards, go back and fire at 25 and 50 yards. You want to know where the bullet really is at various ranges. The prep time at the range should be fun, if it starts being work call it a day. I always like to say when I begin to shoot like crap, it's time for a milk shake and call it a day.

Karl
 

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You can't argue with success "Win73"

By your post I would say that you have a solid system that works really well for you. Nine Deer in the freezer are a testament to your success. I would settle for one in the freezer right now. We didn't get one last year or the year before. I feel a pattern developing that isn't good.

Karl
 

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Dead on hold distance for a 243 Win 100gr

The dead on distance is dependent on the actual velocity that you are getting on your handload at the muzzle and the aerodynamics of your bullet of choice. All of the reloading manuals have the balistic tables in the back that will show for their bullet with a BC of X and a velocity of Y this is your drop at 200 300 400 etc. If you figure you have a kill zone of say 8 inches that gives you a plus/minus of 4. You can then get and idea of at what range your bullet has now dropped say 6 inches. This is if you have set it say 2 inches high at 100 yards. I am sure that someone else has a more scientific way of doing it, but I believe this way will work. Most of us have no business shooting farther than say 200 yards at a Deer in my opinion.

Karl
 
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