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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We just Recently bought a 50 acre farm here in Kentucky up in the mountains...And since I'm gonna be hunting there this Rifle season,I kinda figure I'm gonna get some hard shots. I was kinda wondering if anyone had any advice about shooting in the mountains?
 

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practice with your firearm of choice
 

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west,tx

i dont have any experience huntin in the mountains but i have hunted in west texas where theres alot of hills. when shootin downwards from a hill try 2 remember 2 aim higher than usual.........i learned the hard way.
 

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Climb as high as you can and try to find a spot on a ledge to look down. If you leave early enough you may be able to catch a buck moving into bed. Bucks will bed high and look down all day especially if the wind is coming down from above them. They use there eyes to scan below and there nose for above.

Look for runs going across the ridges with fresh sign. Sitting above these runs can produce if the wind is in your favor. I have hunted the mountains of NH,NY,Vermont and WV and it is not easy but rewarding. Being in shape is a big plus.

If you find a food source with alot of sign then I would hunt those spots as that is most likely your best chance for getting a shot.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks,

Hopefully this year I can take a Big buck..The property owner beside us says he see's alot of Deer in the area,and some good one's too.
 
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lots of scouting. i assume that there isn't a lot of farm fields and there is more woods. with this in mind the deer can be more difficult to pattern so you need to know where each and every food source is. the does number one concern is their bellies and that means the boys will soon make the does their number one concern. you know what i mean hunt the does and you will find the bucks at some point. that would be the quickest way to get going on a new property but not the only way.
 

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when Shooting uphill or downhill, (In most cases) you should NOT try to adjust your aim for the shot. just aim and shoot as you normally would as if the animal was on level ground, that's the best way to handle up or downhill shots BUT if your shooting an animal that's further than 150 yards then you should compensate for the shot BUT again in most cases you're probably not going to be shooting at an animal more than 150 yards up or downhill
If you are in an area where you are shooting long range up or downhill shots then I would suggest a rifle scope that has built in capabilities that help you determine range and angle. Good Luck
 

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I wasn't aware there were mountains east of the big river:surprised: Just kidding there kyteen. Good advice from all. If your hunting during the rut stay on stand all day, those bucks will move anytime. As ronn said look for the does who are lookin/traveling for dinner, the bucks will follow at some point. I would find a good vantage point 1/4 down a ridge and maybe where two ridges come together over looking a couple of runs maybe a creek bottom. The bucks will tend to use whatever thick cover they can to move through, watch entry/exit areas to those.
 
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Right. as you get to know that property you'll figure out where the boys hang out little beter. thing is with big woods and mts its harder to narrow down where the bedding areas are. I think, and I've never heard anyone say anything about it, the hills, guts, ridges change the wind patterns in the woods and with each degree of wind direction and speed the deer could have a different bedding area on a day with those given conditions. just one of my thoughts on mts and deer hunting.
 

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Good thoughts on the wind I really like a 1/4 ing wind in my face if i can get it especially when on foot. In Pa we have a lot of laural thickets the bucks love to travel through these. A person can't crawl through them but a buck can run at full speed through!
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I'm the same way about the wind..There's a big saddle with some huge acorn tree's in there wiht alot of trails going in and out of it..Tree stands are going up this week.
 

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We may have a debate going about where to aim when shooting up or down hill. When shooting either way, you don't have to make any adjustments unless the angle is extreme and/or the distance is significant. I don't have those exact angles and distances available as I write this, but I know where I can get them. When it IS necessary to make an adjusment in hold, whether shooting uphill or down, you always have to hold LOW as your bullet will always hit above your aiming point. I'll try to get those exact figures ASAP.
 
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correct, if it'll make that much difference you may not be taking a good shot. i always thouhgt distance was the biggest factor. meaning it would have to be a loooong shot.
 

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Years ago I questioned up and downhill shots and nobody had a good answer so I researched it and found that ALL uphill and downhill shots
are always going to impact slightly high, that's not because of ballistics it's more of a visual aiming affect between the target and the shooter
SO under typical hunting conditions all uphill or downhill shots shoud be handled like all other shots, just take good aim and shoot,
And Ronn you're right the long range shots require some adjustment for elevation and windage but again in most cases a hunter that hunts in that type of environment where there may be looooong range up or downhill shots would probably be using a scope that covers for long range shots.
 

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when Shooting uphill or downhill, (In most cases) you should NOT try to adjust your aim for the shot. just aim and shoot as you normally would as if the animal was on level ground, that's the best way to handle up or downhill shots BUT if your shooting an animal that's further than 150 yards then you should compensate for the shot BUT again in most cases you're probably not going to be shooting at an animal more than 150 yards up or downhill
If you are in an area where you are shooting long range up or downhill shots then I would suggest a rifle scope that has built in capabilities that help you determine range and angle. Good Luck
Exactly! Buy a range finder and know your distances. Whether up or down if its 100 yards it will shoot 100 yards. The problem with shooting severe angles is it is hard to judge distance with your eyes that is where most tend to believe the ballistics change because they usually over estimate the distance (especially down hill). Gravity pulls the same whether it's up, down or level.

I have always found gaps and saddles to be good spots to ambush deer also look for food and cover just like anywhere else. The edges along clear cuts are always worth checking out.

Good luck, those mountain deer can be hard to hunt but there are some real trophies up there.
 
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