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I did my first attempt at deer ribs the other day, and treated them much like shortribs. I made a braising sauce based on lemon juice, red wine vinegar, and a little Worcestershire. Added brown sugar, molasses, onion and garlic powder, salt and pepper. Plus some thyme and coriander for good measure (I need to figure out why I can't cook anything without coriander). I cooked them at 350 sealed in foil for a bit over 3 hours.

They were very good while hot. Fell right off the bone, and tasted great. When they were cold the fat started to solidify again, and became a little chalky. I think in the summer I would cook them a bit shorter in the oven, then throw them on a grill on high heat to let some of the fat drip away. Maybe at that point throw on a bit of a more traditional BBQ sauce.
 

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glad to hear im not the only guy who eats the ribs.:biggrin:to make pepperoni try a place called LEM they sell kits to make anything
 

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I was amazed when I heard processors usually just throw the ribs away. The woman who helped me butcher told me they often weren't worth bothering with as well (and everyone else says she usually goes overboard trying to retain all the meat).

In some ways they seemed to have advantages over beef ribs. The bone to meat ratio seemed slightly higher once they were cooked, and the ribs pulled out incredibly easily. The texture of deer fat does seem one obvious disadvantage, but I think even beef and pork ribs should usually be cooked long enough to render the fat.
 

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let the birds hunt for their own deer i want that meat:biggrin:
 

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If I was cooking deer ribs, I would parboil them to remove most of the fat then slow cook them with your favorite sauce. I like mesquite wood for babyback ribs.
 
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