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Hi My Friend,

You will likely want to choose a shotgun that you can handle first. I would suggest a 16 or 20 guage if you can handle the recoil. If not try a 410 guage.

When you are using a shotgun for deer, I recommend shooting only slugs. Also whatever gun that you use, you should know it's limitations, by that I mean learn how far away that you can shoot at a target and still hit where you are aiming. If you would like my free ebook on whitetail hunting please go to the classified section on this site and you will see my post for a free ebook.

You will find a lot of useful information in my book as well as a few stories that I'm sure you will enjoy. You see most of us hunters started out when we were your age, and many of us had the same questions that you now have.

If you would like anymore info just let me know.

Learn all you can

AJHunter
 

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All I can say is try it, as long as you feel that you can handle it, then by all means use a 12 guage.

A 12 guage slug will bring down a grizzly bear if shot within 50 yards or so. And it will drop even the biggest of deer, right in their tracks, with a well placed shot.

AJHunter
 

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Scrape hunting is effective, if you know the scrapes are active, and you can stay downwind and well hidden. A treestand will give you a much better chance at a buck that is tending a scrapeline, and you will be able to get a closer shot. You should also know that if you choose to hunt from a treestand, you will need to aim higher on the animal to hit the vitals. Aim just a few inches below the backbone. If you were standing on the ground you would aim just behind the forward shoulder, in the center of the chest cavity, to hit the vitals. But in a treestand if you aim in the center of the chest cavity you may not kill the animal. Think of it this way, the slug will go in where you are aiming but will come out low, because you are shooting down, so to compensate for shooting down you need to aim higher than you would if you were shooting from the ground.

You will find that a mature buck will check his scrapeline, early morning, or late evening. Possibly more, depending on the buck to doe ratio, and how far into the rut.:wink:

Be careful if you choose to use a stand, safety should be your first concern, when using a treestand.

AJHunter
 

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Well I guess the best way to explain this to you would be to go out side and dig the ground bare with a rake or your foot and then look at the ground. It should appear to be slightly wet and possibly dark in color. Now as the sun dries it out it will appear a lighter color.

So learn the difference between a fresh scrape and a scrape that may be old. A buck will visit his active scrapes and dig them up from time to time, during the rut, so keep an eye on any scrape that you find.

If you want him to get angry, go buy some buck urine and pour some in his scrape. The next time he visits, he will really tear it up, hopefully you will be somewhere close by and get a shot at him, or at the very least, get a chance to observe his behavior.

Good Luck

AJHunter:wink:
 

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rublines and scrapelines are a bucks signpost. It is generally considered to be a bucks way of marking his territory. This alerts does' as well as other bucks, that there is a buck in that territory.

This does not mean that any particular buck lays claim to the area, because during the height of the rut, a bigger buck may come along, and drive a less subordinate buck off.

Hope this helps.

AJHunter
 
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