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Alright i'm new to hunting, but not new with shooting rifles but just have never owned one. I was lookin at the savage 30-06 but when i go on their website there are different styles and kinds of the 30-06 and i just dont know what kind im needing (just for deer hunting). thats my first question



2. this kinda follows the first question, but alright, after i get my rifle i am goin to be ready for next years deer season and the land im going out to i have no deer stand, what are other ways that i could be stationary on the ground but still in a good position to take down a deer? and do you have any tips on the deer calls to bring the deer in to sight
 

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Welcome to the site HN8, glad to have you here. I would say the bolt action rifle has much better accuracy hopefully that will gelp narrow your choices a little. As for next season you should scout the area out way before the season starts to help you get a feel of the land and deer sign. Then when that is all done look into possible setup areas in which you could hunt without being seen and note the wind patterns because that is the most important factor whether on the ground or in a tree.
 
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timbers advise is good.

you should go to a gun shop and handle the rifles and find what feels good in your hands and in your shoulder. the different styles have different purposes basically. a heavy rifle is more stable to shoot with less perceived recoil but its HEAVY. a light rifle is quick to handle but harder to settle and the perceived recoil is more.

personally i like synthetic stocks and blued mat finish. wood can go sour and it gets scratched up. real pretty wood it a classic but savage doesn't really use pretty wood. stainless steel is well stainless to a point but i can pick the stainless barrel out like a star wars light saber.

point being there are reasons for the way a rifle is built up and thats to meet your needs. got to figure out your needs to answer the question.

welcome from nh
 

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You could look into a T/C Encore. With the strong future possibility of gun restrictions this choice would allow you to buy the caliber of choice to start then buy additional barrels of different calibers without ever having to deal with registrations. They are very accurate with a cost right in line with most riffles. The cool thing is after the first purchase barrels are only a few hundred dollars.
 

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The Savage Company has been doing a really nice job the last several years to improve their rifles. They now have the Accu-trigger and new accu-stock that look pretty good. I don't own one, but have heard that they shoot well right out of the box, and the price isn't too high.
I would recommend that you take a good look at the Tikka T3 Lite. I do own one of these, and it's fantastic! Guaranteed to shoot 1 inch groups, weighs 6.3 lbs. (without scope) comes with scope rings. At around $600, you can't find a better rifle, period. I wasn't even looking for a rifle, but bought mine after hearing so many experienced shooters saying it was the most accurate rifle they ever owned - a thought with which I concur, and I have owned LOTS of rifles in almost 50 years of hunting. As for stainless barrels, the first ones were as shiny as mirrors and not a good choice for hunting. Now they are all a satin finish which really is no more noticable than a blued barrel. I like the way the stainless barrels wear - or perhaps I should say how they DON"T wear. Good luck, good shooting, and great hunting!
 

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Well I'm not a big fan of savage rifles especially in the last 15 years or so. I hear they are accurate but they look like a model T. I know looks aren't everything. Almost all my guns wear wood and I hunt rain or snow. I like nice wood on my guns. I would be patient and take a look at some clean used rifles. Like ronn said make sure it feels right. Some of the used rifles can be bought right and shoot just as well as anything out of the box. Don't get caught in the 270 vs 30-06 only market do some reshearch and pick something that interests you. I still believe that a remington 700 is still a great rifle. One of my favorite deer rifles is a 1950's Savage model 99 in 300 savage. I think I'm regressing as I look more and more at old classics in old calibers, maybe I'm turning into a classic, no just a model T.
 
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savage has certainly gone this way and that. my dad had a 99 in 300 savage, i think made in 29 not sure. it was an old one with the schnabel and the counter on the side. saw one built in the 70's and it didn't even compare. now they are making some pretty good stuff but they sure are lacking in the nice wood department.
 

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Bolt action hunting rifles are by far the favorite choice of hunters of all types of game. This type of hunting rifle works by engaging and ejecting the cartridge with the use of a bolt. The action of this hunting rifle slides forward and backward to engage and eject. Bolt action rifles can take a few more seconds to load than the alternatives, but most hunters opt for this type of hunting rifle over its counterparts due to the reliability of the gun and the design.
Weatherby, considered by many avid hunters to be the absolute best hunting rifle on the market, is designed with nine locking lugs on their bolt action hunting rifles. The benefit to this design is a more secure locking of the cartridge in the chamber, which increase the accuracy of the flight path of the bullet.
As time progresses and technology advances improve, bolt action hunting rifles are becoming state of the art. The number of locking lugs in bolt action hunting rifles can rage from only one up to Weatherby's nine. Bolt action hunting rifles have varying types of locking devices. Experts and avid hunters alike tend to agree that the preferred type of action for hunting rifles varies with each individual hunter and their preferences.
Bolt action hunting rifles are versatile enough to be effectively used by beginning hunters and those with many seasons under their belts. The brand and caliber of the hunting rifle you choose is based on your preference. The choice of which type of hunting rifle must be based on the type of game you will be hunting, the amount of money you want to spend, cost of ammunition, and how the gun feels when you hold it. If the gun is heavy or feels awkward, it may not be the gun you want for your hunting trip.


Rely on what your fellow hunters and firearms dealers have to say about specific rifles. These people often have many years experience and can recommend the hunting rifle that will best suit your needs. If you have friends and family who hunt, ask them about their preferences. Handle their guns and fire their guns at firing ranges to determine how the gun feels and shoots.
Do diligent research before making a purchase. Be sure to educate yourself before you visit the gun shop. Remember that no matter how much you spend on your hunting rifle, if you're not an accurate shot, the gun will be as much as worthless. Target practice is vital in becoming accurate and maintaining accuracy.
 

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I tend to agree with Hunting Man. The Savage rifles always seemed to like they are just of a much lower quality than the other major brands. (Remington, Winchester, Ruger,etc) I also like the older guns better than newer ones. When I walk into a gun shop, the first place that I usually look is the used gun rack.
A good bolt action is hard to beat, but I've also been very happy with the accuracy & handling of my Remington 7600 "pump action" rifles. I have a 7600 in .30-06 that shoots a better group than my old .30-06 Remington 700 bolt action.
When you decided on a .30-06 you picked an excellent caliber for deer that will also handle any other North American game that you may later decide to persue. Don't let people persuade you to want one of the "big magnum" calibers. They aren't necessary, cost a lot more to shoot, and the recoil from them can make you pick up bad shooting habbits that will affect your accuracy.

The other posters gave good advise when they said to scout early, learn the woods & sign. The more time you spend in the woods ahead of time the better your chances are to be successful.

Good luck,
Al
 

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I'm going to have to disagree with you guys. I have a couple of Savage rifles, and have watched both my sons drop Texas white tails with them - Model 111 in .270 and Model 11 in .243. (Both are bolt action, by the way!) Mine were purchased before they came out with Accu-trigger and all the new fancy technologies, but they are still quite accurate. While I don't have anything against the "new" rifles that I've purchased over the last few years, I do seem to like the older rifles that have been passed down to me.

Y'all brought a smile to my face when someone mentioned the Savage 99 in .300 Savage. My father-in-law has one that he got years/decades ago in his youth and has many memories that go with it. I also have a Remington Model 81 in .300 Savage, though I haven't done any serious hunting with it, something I plan on rectifying next year.

HN8 - the other guys have posted the best advice possible - you have to find something that is comfortable in your hands, something that will fit your "style" of hunting. If you need something for trailing deer over several miles, then something lighter is what you should be looking for. If you're primarily in a blind or tree stand, then maybe something a little heavier would fit your needs better. Regardless the brand name you decide on, most of them offer a wide variety of calibers to choose from. Do your homework and check on the various bullet characteristics before making your final determination. There are so many to choose from these days, it's really hard to pick just one <grin>.

And by all means, get out and walk the land where you'll be hunting. That way you learn where their trails are, not to mention the best places to put up a blind. It never hurts to know exactly where you're bullets are going either. Safety is one thing that cannot be 'preached' enough.
 

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If you use natural ground cover, trying to be 40 or 50 yards downwind of an active deer run, it will get the hunt and stalk mode going in you and should increase your hunting pleasure. Using commercial hunting blinds or fish shantys on the ground or in the air over bait piles is just meat hunting and you lose the thrill of the hunt and your sporting ability of fair chase (after all, like most of us, you will already be using a modern firearm) that in itself should be enough advantage for you except what natural ground cover you can use (ferns, old stumps, cradle knowls ect.) Best I can tell you is not to copy most of these modern hunters that give themselves all of the advantages and the deer none and hunt and stalk you prey giving it a fair chase chance, yup you might not catch your prey everytime but when you do, you will have earned it, pretty much like your forefathers did. And you will get maximum enjoyment from the hunt, after all, its nice to have some venison to eat but, you don't need it for you or your familys survival. I don't see many sportsman out hunting today as in years past. Shooting a deer over a bait pile from a shack 80 to 100 yards away with a scoped high power rifle or muzzle loader is not much of a hunt. Theres nothing wrong giving yourself some advantages, but all I am trying to say is give the deer some advantage and when you get one, and you will, you will have full bragging rights and rightly so.
Good Luck,
Richard


2. this kinda follows the first question, but alright, after i get my rifle i am goin to be ready for next years deer season and the land im going out to i have no deer stand, what are other ways that i could be stationary on the ground but still in a good position to take down a deer? and do you have any tips on the deer calls to bring the deer in to sight[/QUOTE]
 
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If you use natural ground cover, trying to be 40 or 50 yards downwind of an active deer run, it will get the hunt and stalk mode going in you and should increase your hunting pleasure. Using commercial hunting blinds or fish shantys on the ground or in the air over bait piles is just meat hunting and you lose the thrill of the hunt and your sporting ability of fair chase (after all, like most of us, you will already be using a modern firearm) that in itself should be enough advantage for you except what natural ground cover you can use (ferns, old stumps, cradle knowls ect.) Best I can tell you is not to copy most of these modern hunters that give themselves all of the advantages and the deer none and hunt and stalk you prey giving it a fair chase chance, yup you might not catch your prey everytime but when you do, you will have earned it, pretty much like your forefathers did. And you will get maximum enjoyment from the hunt, after all, its nice to have some venison to eat but, you don't need it for you or your familys survival. I don't see many sportsman out hunting today as in years past. Shooting a deer over a bait pile from a shack 80 to 100 yards away with a scoped high power rifle or muzzle loader is not much of a hunt. Theres nothing wrong giving yourself some advantages, but all I am trying to say is give the deer some advantage and when you get one, and you will, you will have full bragging rights and rightly so.
Good Luck,
Richard


2. this kinda follows the first question, but alright, after i get my rifle i am goin to be ready for next years deer season and the land im going out to i have no deer stand, what are other ways that i could be stationary on the ground but still in a good position to take down a deer? and do you have any tips on the deer calls to bring the deer in to sight
[/QUOTE]

hahahahahaha is about all i can say to that
 

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I understand what the oldguy is trying to express here and when you consider the way hunting was many years ago in it's most primitive form vs what hunters have available to them today, there's a HUGE difference.

Years ago a hunter was literally at one with the animal and when he/she were successful they only had themselves to thank, hunters today rely too heavily on modern technology and manufactured gadgetry,,, I'm guilty of it myself.
Years ago the hunter had his hunting outfit a good shooting rifle, basic lead ammunition, probably a compass, a rope and a knife.

Todays hunter uses the most technologically advanced long rifles, the most innovated ammunition, scopes, spotting scopes, rangefinders, a knife, a rope, calls, scents (lures and masking), baits (where legal), food plots, blinds, "Special" clothing, a hoard of tree stands, compasses, aerial maps, gps units, the internet, special hearing aids, even outfitters who raise deer in fenced compounds and lord knows what else I haven't thought about.
And there's nothing wrong if a hunter chooses to use any or all of that stuff so long as they do it within the laws of the areas they're hunting in.
 
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calls have been around for a long long long long time used by the indians thats deer, turkey, moose, probably elk and others. they also used scents and decoys. the old sharps 45.70 could kill a buffalo a long long way out there. i take it as an insult that sitting in a tree stand isn't fair chase. the oldguy slammed allot of hunters, the majority of them, with rhetoric that is spouted by the antis. "the hunter has all the advantages" is nothing but laughable.
 

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modern day tech has changed the modern hunter. for the better or the worse???? don't know. have tried many different things on the market that are supposed to attract deer. Deer Cane---- never hit it, C'mere deer--- stood in the tree line and blew at it. i plant food plots, supplement feed. watch my scent by hunting the wind. and use alittle code blue during the rut. that is about the extent of it for me. i found once a got a handle on my scent control, and paid closer attiontion to my surroundings--on the way to the stand. i have seen alot more deer sitting and while walking.
 
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