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My neighbor has just set up a box blind that is less than 50 yds from my property line and he is looking and shooting into my land and another neighbors who has not given him permission. Is there any laws against this and does anyone have any suggestions?
 

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If you're not feeling safe with the situation OR if it puts you or other neighbors in harms way, you may want to give a Fish/Game officer a call and ask them if they could talk with this neighbor on your behalf.
Good Luck
 

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im with bruce but if im not mistaken most states say that if your hunting private and the deer is not on the land that you are authorized to hunt then your not supposed to shoot it so i would personally have a game warden look at the set up that he has and then have him talk with the guy so the officer knows what the set up looks like with no arguement between you and your neighbor as to how its set up.
 

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Unless you make your intention to him or if you post it he can do it. At least thats the way it is in NH. Bruce is right , ask the assistance of the fish and game dept. to document it if nothing else.
 

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Here you must be 300 yards from an occupied building unless you have the owners permission.Other than that there are no laws as to how close you can be to someone elses property or if your bullets or pellets (from a shotgun) travel onto thier land.
 

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Here in Missouri, we paint our fence posts PURPLE, or at least the tops of them. If I were you I'd paint them purple where this guy is looking onto your land. PURPLE paint means NO HUNTING/NO TREASPASSING. Also, is he bow hunting or gun? If it's bow, he might be waiting for deer to come on his place, but if you know it's gun, I would definately try to talk to the guy and/or talk to the game warden if he is non-compliant. I would also invest in some "no hunting" signs, that way if this guy does "hunt your property", he'll be in more serious trouble.
Don't know about everyone else, but I can't stand people who don't respect others' land. Some people think they can hunt anywhere and that fences don't matter. This is how people end up hurt, or dead on hunting trips.
 

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I agree tator In New Hampshire though fences don't mean anything If it ain't posted it is legal unless the owner of the property has told you he does not want you there so I agree I would post it
 

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Check you state laws or ask the wildlife man in your area. In Tennessee you are required to have the landowners permision to hunt posted or not. Here he can put a stand on the the line but not shoot or retreive deer across the line without permision. If the land in TN is posted correctly you don't even have to prossicute or show up in court the state will charge the trespasser without you if they don't have the required written permision.
 

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Either way if he shoots something and it runs to your land he will be trespassing to come get it, if he shoots something on your land and has to come get it he is trespassing, in Mississippi land doesn't have to be posted for you to be trespassing dont know where you are. My neighbor did the same thing so I just put a stand on my property next to the fence right in front of his, never hunted it but figured it might keep him from shooting om my place.
 

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Here in MO on the property I hunt, there are 5 neighbors. I always contact them by phone or stop by their house to check with them before the season to make sure I can access their property if a deer I shoot happens to make it's way onto their property. They always say yes, but I make sure I ask every year. This way, there are no surprises and they develop a sense of trust and respect for you since you are asking first instead of just GOING on their property.
I once went over to my sister's house and her neighbor was an avid hunter. In his back yard there was a large wooden swingset and hanging from this upside down was the largest buck I have ever seen. He was a 12 point and probably around 160-170 class. As I walked over to admire it, I retraced my steps when I saw the game warden pull up and knock on this neighbors front door. The neighboring property to where this guy hunts filed a complaint that this guy shot this deer on HIS property and retreived it by trespassing. Of course my sis's neighbor denied it. The game warden told him, "let's go out to your hunting spot, you show me where you shot him, if there's blood on your side of the fence, you can keep the deer, if there isn't any blood, then it's trouble". They went, and about 2 hours later I witnessed the game warden and another officer loading up the biggest deer I ever saw. and they handed the guy a ticket w/a fine. No blood on his side of the fence.
GENERALLY.... you can make a case for yourself if you shoot an animal and are trying to retreive it on a neighbors property, but you had better make sure you shot it on YOUR property and that there is clear evidence. If not, I would contact the neighbor first.
 

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you gotta go talk to the guy and convey your feelings to him.this way if something happens theres no b.s. as to what you told him your position was. people will often violate rules by saying oh you never told me that.eliminate the guesswork.
 

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Here in MO on the property I hunt, there are 5 neighbors. I always contact them by phone or stop by their house to check with them before the season to make sure I can access their property if a deer I shoot happens to make it's way onto their property. They always say yes, but I make sure I ask every year. This way, there are no surprises and they develop a sense of trust and respect for you since you are asking first instead of just GOING on their property.
I once went over to my sister's house and her neighbor was an avid hunter. In his back yard there was a large wooden swingset and hanging from this upside down was the largest buck I have ever seen. He was a 12 point and probably around 160-170 class. As I walked over to admire it, I retraced my steps when I saw the game warden pull up and knock on this neighbors front door. The neighboring property to where this guy hunts filed a complaint that this guy shot this deer on HIS property and retreived it by trespassing. Of course my sis's neighbor denied it. The game warden told him, "let's go out to your hunting spot, you show me where you shot him, if there's blood on your side of the fence, you can keep the deer, if there isn't any blood, then it's trouble". They went, and about 2 hours later I witnessed the game warden and another officer loading up the biggest deer I ever saw. and they handed the guy a ticket w/a fine. No blood on his side of the fence.
GENERALLY.... you can make a case for yourself if you shoot an animal and are trying to retreive it on a neighbors property, but you had better make sure you shot it on YOUR property and that there is clear evidence. If not, I would contact the neighbor first.
He's lucky that the fine was ALL that he got. TX game wardens would have confiscated EVERYTHING used in hunting/shooting that deer as well, the rifle, any vehicle involved (if there was one), etc. Heard a story about one guy caught hunting in the "wrong" spot. The guy HAD a brand new 4 wheel drive SUV that just happened to be about the same color as the local sheriff's department. Sheriff's department got a "new" vehicle for the county, a new rifle for their SWAT team, and the guy had to call his wife in nothing but his skivvies.

What's that saying on TV?? Don't mess with Texas??? :thumbup:
 
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