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I shot a nice buck 2 days ago, I tracked one of the easiest blood trails i can remember. Problem is the trail kept going and going, then out of no where its gone. I hit the deer in the front one-third and had massive piles of blood. Any sugestions on what, where, and how to find this deer. My next move is search the hollows around where the blood disapeared.
 

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Front 1/3 of the deer.....High or low? Did the arrow exit the animal? Was the blood bright red or dark? Was there small bubbles in the blood? Did you mark the blood trail so you can go back to search? Do you know the property well? Did you find any places where the buck laid down along the bloodtrail? What did he do the moment your arrow hit him? How far did you trail him? How long after the shot did you start trailin him?

Lots of unanswered questions and lots of variables. If you know the property well, you should have an idea where the buck would run to. You might have pushed him if you started trailin too soon or if took him too long to die. I once trailed a buck an hour after I hit him for a long way and found him alive...barely. I had to shoot him again. I hit him very low in the chest. Good blood trail tho.

Sometimes a liver shot will take a long time to kill a deer. The blood will look dark in color, darker than lung blood and there shouldn't be any bubbles in it. If that was the case, you prolly pushed him. Try looking at the blood trail as a whole and seeing the direction he was going then look at the terrain and try to figure out what he was heading to. Hard situation, I feel for you. Good Luck
 

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also bring along a spray bottle of Hydrogen peroxide spray in the area the blood stopped when sprayed on blood you can not even see it will bubble up also where the blood stopped start searching in circles going larger & larger if there was that much blood it shouldn't be far
 

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I'm with gfdeputy on this one. get you some of those marking flags (the ones electrical or utility companies use) and mark where you found blood. Go to the furtherest spot away from where you shot the deer and place a flag. Then start walking in circles around that area. Every time you see even a DRIP of blood, flag it. Keep doing this. One thing I have learned about deer is after they have been hit, they can be EXCELLENT hiders. I once lung shot a doe and she jumped a creek and crawled up under the roots of a giant oak that was coming out of the bank of the creek. NEVER would've found her if I didn't have about 5 ppl looking for her. PLUS she was still alive.
You also have to think about coyotes. If it's been out there for 2 days, you really need to be searching hard RIGHT now. If the coyotes haven't got to him yet, it won't be long... then GOOD luck! Do the circles and mark with the flags, and you should be able to pick up where the buck did go eventually. I've seen bucks circle back around and go the OPPOSITE direction from where you expected him to go.
 

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Most of us have been in your shoes. If you hunt long enough a non-recovered animal will happen. As stated above, most times a long blood trail is from a marginal hit or a animal that's being pushed that would otherwise lay down and expire. It amaises me sometimes how they can stay on their feet following a good hit. I'm talking bow hunting here. There is another discussion on this subject also, where we covered the many ways to decipher blood trails and sign after the shot. 2 days would indicate that the deer most likely stayed on its feet and survived despite the blood trail. Deer seem to possess high blood clotting genetics to me?I lost a Michigan bow hit buck which was at the time , I thought, a perfect front 1/3 up side shot. After a 1.5 day no recover, we assessed that I probably hit it higher than I thought, under the spine, and missed all vital organs ect. I started with two sided blood trail which became a exit only trail then nothing after 1/4 mile. It was a 0* day out and miserable time in the stand. It happens to most of us, it makes you feel pretty bad inside for a long time, however we keep hunting! Just do your best, that's all you can do!
 

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I've had good luck with leaving a shot deer lay for a few hours, fight the urge to chase!! It will lay down, if wounded and bleed out..unless you push it. Then it may bolt and leave very little trail.

The local waterholes and creek beds are popular laydown spots for the deer.
Typically they run downhill, in my experience.

Being shot for a few days, this probably doesn't help. If it did die, its probably a rotted mess by now.
I've been fortunate to have the last few die within 50 yards. No tracking when that happens.:thumbup:
 
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