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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys. I have another quick question. Just how important is shot placement my son is going to be going after his first deer all I read about is shot placement. He is not that great of a shot yet we practice as much as I can afford I have him practicing on a ten inch gong at a 100 yards but u never know what will happen he is going to be using a 243 probably loaded with a 95 gr partition. Any digestions?
 

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Shot placement is so critical. It is the difference between a wounded animal running around in the woods in pain having a slow excruciating death....an accurate, dead on shot giving a quick, ethical death.....or a clean miss.
 

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Just teach him the vital organs on a deer. Google it and it will show you if you are not even sure. I was always taught to go up the back of the front leg to the middle of the body! Will get them everytime!

Goodluck and keep him shooting!
 

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I would make sue he can hit where he aims before letting him shoot at a game animal. I can't see if using a scoped rifle why he can't be a bit more accurate. If you don't mind, how old is he?
 

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TimberGhost is right, shot placement is extremely Critical, if a hunter (whether youth or adult) has problems shooting targets accurately,
then I think that hunter needs to spend more time learning to shoot better before going afield for wild game animals.
It's not just for the Vital shot you have to be concerned with, The safety of every hunter in the area is on the line when a shot rings out, something to always keep in mind.
Good Luck and I hope you and your son are sharing hunts together soon.
 

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I think having the shot placement depends on the purpose of the shot or the position of the deer. But to most hunters, they consider to shoot it to the Kill Zone. This zone includes the shoulder area, and behind it the heart and lungs. Viewed broadside, it is roughly centered on the rear of the shoulder. This gives the hunter the best chance at hitting vital organs and/or the shoulder. Depending on the size of the critter, you're shooting at a zone that's approximately the size of a supper plate.

I think that's one must consider.
 

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I'm not a shoulder shot proponet and here's why. Shooting a light weight bullet like a 243 and hitting high goes into heavy bone area. It probably will drop the deer but then you will have to dispatch it a second time and maybe the son won't like a screaming thrashing deer that he just shot and has to shoot again. Second, why waste up to 30% of the front end of the deer in meat loss by shooting it in the shoulder. That is where 2 roasts are and burger is. Why not teach him to hit the true dinner plate area and not waste any meat. I harvested a buck one time after it was shot with a 243 and acted like it hadn't been hit. Shoot for a double lung hit and you will be fine!
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks

Thanks for the info guys I am thinking along those lines that is why I am getting him used to hitting the ten inch gong once he can do that easy then I will teach him where to put that shot he is 14 a
nd is real excited about the hunt this fall
 

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the 243 is a great weapon. My son has been shooting one for a few years. I started him off shooting 12" paper targets, and once he got over the flinches, and got his breathing right, i started using smaller targets.

Hitting a gong is fine and fun, but not really gonna be able to see his groupings on a peice of steel. Shoot as often as you can afford, muscle memory will help improve his shooting.
 

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I recommend that you practice at 50 yards with him

One thing that I did with my Sons is to have them shoot at 50 yards instead of 100 yards. Their groups then were all on the paper and their confidence went up as the groups got smaller. Where we hunt a 50 yard shot is about the max you would get. I like the suggestion of shooting the Deer in the lungs if it is broadside to you. I taught my Sons to shoot for the shoulder one third of the way up the body. We use 30-06s I have no worry about hitting solid bone and I want that Deer down immediately if possible. I saw you say that you will be using Premium ammo using Partitions for the bullets. Those bullets are wonderful but for the cost you could buy twice as many Remington Core-locks or Federal Fusions and get alot more shooting practice in. There is no subsitute for actually putting rounds down range when a new shooter is on their steep learning curve.

Karl
 

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I know we are splitting hairs, no pun intended, here but I value every piece of deer meat to take out the shoulders. I know it drops them quickly, but a double lung shot wastes virtually no meat and is a perfect killing shot resulting in a quick harvest. Again, please don't take this as a shot debate it is not, just an opinion. I like the 50 yd target idea for centerfire rifles. I would add that starting with pellet rifles and 22's builds up youth confidence when moving up to centerfire rifles. The quickest way to destroy a youth shooter is to over gun them and get them afraid of the recoil.
 

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Lung shots are a winner...

I agree that it probibly is a better shot, and not wasting delicious venison is a huge bonus. I just always figured if you see the front leg and just follow it up a little into the body of the animal it is pretty idiot proof. The 243 Win that he will be shooting would definitely make a mess out of the lungs on any Deer. The animal can't got far without lungs.

Karl
 

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but a double lung shot wastes virtually no meat and is a perfect killing shot resulting in a quick harvest.

Between what HM said in his quote above and what TG said about shot placement, I can't add anything different. Shot four deer this past season, three were double lung. One dropped in place, one took six steps and dropped, one went maybe 30 yards before dropping. Blew it and missed most of the vitals on deer number four. Had to go chase that one all over the countryside before finally being able to put it out of its misery. Bad for both me and the deer and regret (now) pulling the trigger in the first place.

Start shooting targets at 25 yards until groupings are tight before moving out to 50 yards. Only when groupings are tight at 50 yards would I move out to 100 yards. Kind of defeating the purpose if he can't hit the target consistently at 100 yards and you have to figure out what he's doing wrong. It's SOOOO much easier to do this at 25 and 50 yards.

My $.02 on the subject . . . . .

RR

P.S. BTW, my youngest son started out on a Savage Model 11 in .243. He's 16 now and has 'graduated' to the model 111 in .270.
 

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Just echoing what has already been said. Shot placement is every thing in regard to achieving a quick humane kill. Practice and discipline likely being the two components in accomplishing the best shot placement possible.
Idally you will be with your son so you can talk him through his first couple of on deer shots. With a .243 IMO you are best to restrict yourself to heart and lung shots.
Best of luck!
 
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