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Ok well I began my hunting experience about 4 years ago with my cousin and fell in love with it. He taught me somethings but due to family issues we no longer talk and I am still in need of help. I went out with him 4 times and heard a deer but I have never seen one in 3 hunting seasons!
Ok well This area that I'm hunting has deer. There are footprints are on a dirt path and you can see several paths heading into the woods. The prints on the path however aren't used everyday or even every two days. I thought that deer used the same paths daily?... In this area there is one small water source. The other is over a mile away so I think that this source is where the deer go. The area is all woods will oak trees throughout. There for im not really positive where they have a "feeding area" because they can eat as they walk. Also there is 2 spots where bucks were seen 2 years ago about 1/2-3/4 miles apart. Were the bucks the same deer? or were they likely 2 different bucks? also I never heard that they were shot is it possible that those same bucks or new bucks came into those areas for this rut? Should I hunt a water hole where I think deer are using? or a past buck territory? I have my doe tag this year and would really like to fill my tag. I know I threw a lot of info here but I would just really like help to get my first deer. Thanks very much to who ever can give me help or advice.

Are the deer likely to travel over a mile to the other water source?
 

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Hey zach, welcome to the site. I guess some trails maybe morning, some afternoon and some night. If the area has only 1 water source then chances are good that there will be deer there to drink because a deer needs water and if bucks are running hard then they will need water too. Oaks have acorns and deer love acorns and I believe that they will eat White Oak first before Red Oak acorns. Good Luck to you.
 

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Zach - When I first started hunting about 30 years ago I made the mistake of walking all over God's creation trying to find deer. Do most of your walking before the season starts scouting for good areas. If your confident you have a good spot do all you can to stay put and conceal your movements. Stay in the shady areas vs open sunlight. Practice good scent control. Look for white flashing of a wagging tail, the horizontal line of the back, movement etc. Break it down and look for parts of the deer vs the whole deer. Walk when the weather allows you to. (windy, raining etc) Exercise patience and your opportunity will come.
 

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Zach - When I first started hunting about 30 years ago I made the mistake of walking all over God's creation trying to find deer. Do most of your walking before the season starts scouting for good areas. If your confident you have a good spot do all you can to stay put and conceal your movements. Stay in the shady areas vs open sunlight. Practice good scent control. Look for white flashing of a wagging tail, the horizontal line of the back, movement etc. Break it down and look for parts of the deer vs the whole deer. Walk when the weather allows you to. (windy, raining etc) Exercise patience and your opportunity will come.

Well said Roz!
 

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Zach - When I first started hunting about 30 years ago I made the mistake of walking all over God's creation trying to find deer. Do most of your walking before the season starts scouting for good areas. If your confident you have a good spot do all you can to stay put and conceal your movements. Stay in the shady areas vs open sunlight. Practice good scent control. Look for white flashing of a wagging tail, the horizontal line of the back, movement etc. Break it down and look for parts of the deer vs the whole deer. Walk when the weather allows you to. (windy, raining etc) Exercise patience and your opportunity will come.
:goodposting: Excellent Reply!
 

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I don't know that I can offer any quick fixes but I would suggest the following:

1) Realize hunting is a lifelong journey. I'm 45 and have been hunting since I was 10. There is not a year that goes by that I don't learn something new about deer hunting.
2) Deer are highly adaptive to changing seasons, food sources, weather, hunting pressure, and so on.
3) There are three things every deer must have to survive: food, water, and areas to bed. I've found the best locations to be between (or near) bedding and food areas.
4) Use available technology. Get aerial maps and look for natural funnels. These may be narrow pinch points where deer are likely to travel. I've also had a lot of luck on "edges"; where pines meet oaks, fence rows, along fields and so on.
5) If you live in an area where it snows, plan a trip to the woods a day or so after snowfall. This will help you locate heavy travel cooridors. Understand they can and do change, but atleast you will have a starting point.
6) You've mentioned hunting an area with oaks, I would comb the woods and look for blown down trees. If you find a cluster of them, you may well have found a good bedding area.
7) Continue to talk to friends and take every advantage of hunting property they may have access to.
8) Don't overlook public land. Remember, most hunters travel no further than 1/3 of a mile from where they park. I've taken some nice deer on public land.
9) Most importantly, stay with it. Some of my most memorable hunts were spent with my dad when we killed nothing but time.
 
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