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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just got stationed in Kansas and Ive never been deer hunting before. Anyone have any tips for me on getting started? kind of camo, rifles, equiptment?
 

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The way you say stationed, I 'm led to believe you are Miltary. Join the on post rod and gun club and you can learn alot about the area, Safety, and go on guided hunts. Thanks for your continued service and welcome to DHC.com.
 

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The way you say stationed, I 'm led to believe you are Miltary. Join the on post rod and gun club and you can learn alot about the area, Safety, and go on guided hunts. Thanks for your continued service and welcome to DHC.com.

Right on AW!!! Also, being stationed in Kansas is a great start. Welcome aboard.......
 

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The Rod and Gun Club is usually found somewhat close to the small arms ranges or on post lakes. It is part of the military (MWR) morale, welfare, and recreation division. These are the people that you have to go through to hunt on post and use ranges for personal shooting and such. It really is a good group to join to pass military time without being down town in trouble. As part, you may have to go out on details to clean ranges of spent brass and litter at the lakes but its all part of it. Talk to your leader or somebody who has been on-post for a while and they can direct you to the correct building.
 

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Awesome! I know what ill be doing tomorrow at lunch! Right now im just trying to get involved with the right people so i can have fun and be safe at the same time. Im starting with trying to find the right rifle to work on my aim for next year. i dont think its exactly like shooting an m16 lol.
 

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The BRAS (breathe, relax, aim, squeeze,) technique is the same but every rifle is a little different. Being a military town there ought to be alot of pawn shops there. Go down and handle some and see what best fits your frame. Maybe get in good with the owners and strike a deal. The terrain in Kansas can be different from area to area so try to find something that can make long shots as while short. You want something that you can shoulder (pull up and aim) quickly with one smooth light and quite movement. If you read some of the past post on rifle and shotgun choices it will give you a better outlook on what you may need. I like the 30/30 Marlin for a first timer but the 30.06 and .270 are great all around rifles also.
 

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First of all welcome Kansas, and thanks for your service. You really got lucky being stationed in Kansas. There are some really nice bucks in this state and there are some really good hunting areas around Eldorado Lake, Kingman State Lake, and Marion Resivior. All of these places are within an hour and a half of Wichita. I live north of Wichita in Whitewater and hunt this area. If you are interested I know a few people in the area that I could possibly get you on some private ground. Any questions please contact me.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Definately! Its nice to see that the hunting community is so helpful, especially for someone like myself who's just getting started. Thank You both for the help.
 

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looks like they got you pointed in the right direction.dont forget to keep coming back here with progress reports:biggrin:I want to thank you for volunteering for this great country of ours.
 

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There's a good chance you'll have to pass hunters safety if you haven't had a license in another state, but it's no big deal. Here in Idaho they even have an online course where you just have to show up for one shooting day. Military may be able to opt out, but I don't know.

This was my first year really deer hunting (my father hunted because we needed the meat, but I didn't go out more than once or twice after hunters safety). So take all of this with a grain of salt. I actually just joined the group because I was in a similar boat a few months back, and really would like to encourage you to go for it.

As far as camo goes, your BDUs are probably more than sufficient. Many people hunt without it (I didn't wear any and was successful, but we have a much longer season here and either sex for a whitetail tag)...matching general lightness and proper technique seem to be regarded as more important than the fanciest design. Overall comfort is going to matter much more than anything else, especially if you get rain/snow.

Rifles...endless debate. I've been reading like crazy for the last three months, and it goes round and round. My family hunted with a Winchester .30-30 and .32. I absolutely hated them. When I decided to hunt I went to a friend who used to own a gun store, and she laid out all sorts of options for me. I ended up falling in love with a Savage model 99 in .308, and it ended up working great for me. She hunts with a Springfield bored to .300 win mag (set up for much longer ranges than we see here, so she loads the rounds very cold now). There are something like a dozen common calibers, and hundreds of rifles, that are great for deer. They all have upsides and downsides, and practice is more important than the rifle itself.

And shooting the M16 will be good training. I'm sure they've drilled out the flinch reflex, and you will have put more rounds downrange than some hunters shoot in a lifetime. It's a smaller caliber than most hunt with (although some will use an AR-15), and you may have to get used to bolt or lever action rather than semi-auto, but it won't be a big jump.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Well ive never been on any kind of hunt before. I wanna learn more about everything before i go out and waste any of my time by making rookie mistakes. Taking hunters safety is deffinately on my to do list. I am also looking for the right rifle. something comfortable that i can shoot consistantly from 50-200 yards. This is all in preparation for next year because right now Im also planning my wedding so thats taking alot of my time.

As far as camo goes i figured that id go out and try and match up some like colors to help blend in. Im sure alot of first timers fidget and move and give away their position more often than a seasoned vet.

Also, what kind of gear should i bring? binoculars, rifle, ammo, cammo, food...?
 
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happy to hear you're getting into hunting. first of all making mistakes out there isn't a waste of time. thats a great lessen tool. next learn all you can about the animal you are going to be hunting. read everything you can, watch everything you can, and listen to those successful hunters. as for deer color doesn't mean much cause they don't see color the way we do. they see some better than others. blue and yellow are very visible to them. where red and orange are seen as natural. there is a list of books on here somewhere. another thing deer season prep starts now, today, for next year. deer hunting is a year round process or it should be. lots and lots to learn doesn't mater how many years you been hunting. join a hunting club that will put you in contact with other hunters and a place to learn. mind you weigh everything you are told carefully cause the goals and techniques of different hunters are of course, different in some aspects. The best book I know of is "Precision Bowhunting, a year-round approach to taking mature whitetails" by John & Chris Eberhart good hunting and congrats on the wedding
 

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Also, what kind of gear should i bring? binoculars, rifle, ammo, cammo, food...?

If you do bring food into the field it's probably better if it's something well sealed for scent reason, maybe granola bars as a snack. You could leave more filling, and harder to carry food in the vehicle and come back to eat midday if necessary.

At least one good knife for field dressing, and just to have in general, is important. There are a couple of other tools that might be handy for field dressing but aren't necessary (Butt Out tool, Wyoming Knife, maybe string/small cable ties for closing off the bladder before removal). Gloves you can shoot in are great to have, even if doesn't feel horribly cold out. It's amazing how the cold can creep in when you aren't moving at all.

Do bring your cell phone (turned off or on silent) if there's a chance of reception in the area around where you're hunting. You may not get any reception, but it can speed up getting help if you need friends to help pack out your deer (or you). Plus you can warn people you're coming in with one if they're going to help process.

Some rope and a tarp can be handy to have in your vehicle, and maybe a few gallons of water in case of a gut shot. Extra clothing in case you get wet and general cold weather survival stuff.
 

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Oh, and I checked. Kansas is one of the states that requires hunter orange to be worn...hat and vest it appears, so you'll need that as well. That's one of the reasons not to go crazy for camo. Even if they can't see orange well you're going to be throwing a pretty solid chunk over your torso to stay legal (and it's a very good idea to at least wear the hat). Orange can also be very useful for marking a downed deer if you have to leave it and come back.
 

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First of all, thanks for your service. Second, welcome to deer hunting. You might want to look at public land options for Kansas. A quick tip is scent control. A whitetail's nose is his key sense. Always put the wind in your favor. Again, thanks and good luck.
 
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