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There is no doubt that coyotes CAN take down adult deer, however, I do not believe it is that common. Much of the research that says coyotes only take fawns, actually says that their highest predation rate is on fawns. Bobcats are much more of a problem in my book. I have seen coyotes just out walking around and go right through deer without the deer even being bothered. However, EVERY time I have seen a cat in the field, the deer freak out and often try to run the cat out of the field.

I have a few thoughts on the pics though. It is August in OK so it could be a buck facing heat exhaustion. The buck could've been run there from somewhere else and already close to giving up. Something about the deer doesn't seem right to me either, something about the body and head seems off but I can't place it.

However, there is no doubt that anyone wanting to strictly manage their deer and increase their numbers/reproductive success needs to participating in predator management. Predators need to be managed like anything else. Wolves, coyotes, bobcats, and birds of prey all need to be kept within certain numbers and as long as they are, there is no true harm to the other wildlife (in an ecosystem type of sense)
 

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Predator,

I know birds of prey are under federal protection, but as a wildlife biologist I believe they need to be controlled through some sort of hunting/shooting (be it if only by federal/state officials). If every other species of predators need managing, they why don't birds of prey?

I have argued with several state and federal officials about it. There is more money than you can imagine being poured into quail re-establishment, and they keep saying habitat, habitat, habitat. Yet after all the acres re-planted in NWSGs there has been little to NO overall gain in quail population (granted CRP and other programs recommended WAY to high rates of planting). I believe that if you look at many of the birds of prey populations they are/were at too high of a level and that is one of the main reasons the quail have suffered in several areas. The honest, down to the point answer that I normally get for talking about birds of prey management, is that the birding community and general public would be up in arms if it was ever suggested. Therefore the it is never brought up....so even though it might help biologically, because people FEEL bad about it, it will probably never happen.

Just my $0.02....I am actually hoping to get a grad position dealing with predator management, ecology, or behavior so maybe I will have some data readily at hand before too long
 
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