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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all,

I was browsing the internet for a few days looking for information to assist me in my upcoming first deer hunt, and thought this looked like a great place to ask the "dumb" questions that circulate through my mind without a harsh response. Hope I'm right.

I'm 25, living in the Adams county area of NE, I just recently moved from the Lincoln area and decided this year would be the year I'd finally just get off my rear and go hunting on my own. I come from a family that does not and will not hunt, so for years I've kinda asked around to see if anyone had interest in accompanying me with no real success. So I'm just gonna go it on my own.

So right, the questions.

First thing I'm immediately concerned about is location, I don't really know anyone with land so I'm probably going to have to go public. Being new to the area I'm not as familiar with the public lands available to me. Ive found several possibilities using the NE G&P hand guide for the upcoming season, but if anyone from NE has suggestions Im all ears.

I'm using a Remington Model 710 30-06 Springfield Ive been shooting since I was about 17. That being said I'm very comfortable with the rifle but I do need to spend some time resighting with some actual hunting ammunition because Im sure it was jostled when I moved, and I usually target plink with the cheap stuff. When dealing with the large open spaces associated with NE what rounds would be a good choice?

Im sure ill think of something else in the days to come, thanks for any suggestions given in advance.
 

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I use the same rifle and I love it. If you are comfortable and feel confident enough to make a good shot on wild game then you are off to a good start. There is no such thing as a dumb question here so ask away and we will all do our part in getting you going in the right direction. Welcome aboard buddy.
 

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I don't have anything in .30-06, but I've never gone wrong using Remington Core-Lokts. They've always proved themselves with any caliber I've tried. According to their website, they make they in 150/168/180 grain. If you're out for deer, I'd try staying with the 150 or 168 grain. Just because the bullet's larger doesn't mean that the deer is going to be any more dead.

Anytime you move, or even before every season, it's always prudent to re-zero your sights just to make sure your bullet is going where you think it's going.

And like Timberghost said, "There is no such thing as a dumb question here so ask away". I've asked my share of "dumb questions" on this forum and have always had them answered.
 

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Welcome to the site! like they they have said above, no dumb questions here. I started deer hunting with a 30-06 and used the 150 gr for many years. The 165 gr bullets are getting good reviews here also so maybe try a couple of different weights to see what your rifle likes the best.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
So anyone have any experience with this area?

Im checking out:

5. Leonard A. Koziol WMA – Howard County; 2½N of St. Paul on U.S. Hwy. 281, 2E
and ½N; deer, dove, pheasant, quail, rabbit, squirrel, turkey, waterfowl; 328 acre

Someone at my work mentioned it, said it seemed to have a healthy population in and around there
 

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Another thing you can do is contact one of your local wildlife officers (Game warden), explain to them this will be your first year hunting in the area and do they have any specific reccomendations for a good public hunting location, they're always willing to help out and always offer great advice...

Good luck
 

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If I were you, I'd find some local farmers who are having trouble keeping deer off their crops. Maybe go to the local feed store or MFA and post something on the bulletin board saying you're looking for deer hunting property and you'll help farmers out in summer time to "pay" for your hunting time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
So if ya'll had a backpack with all the things you'd take with you to the actual field what all would be in it?

I'm assuming besides the rifle of choice, ammunition, extra layers of clothing, the permits/stamps etc., a field dressing kit (knife, bags, gloves, ?), optics of some kind, maybe a basic map of the area and a compass.. what else?

My plan is to go out a week or two before the season starts, find some signs of activity and just find a comfortable place set up shop and wait. The wind that time of year is usually out of the N to NW so Ill be looking for spots south of said activity. What about commercial lures, scents, calls etc. any of it worth my time or should I just stick to my original plan?

Deer – November Firearm Nov. 13
 

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I shoot the same rifle as well. I use 150 gr remington core lokt. I have never not dropped a deer. (when I hit it!!!)

You have a decent plan already. Scouting is more important than any gadget you can purchase.

Beside the basics that you need I will give you a run down of what I do and carry.

I go with wildlife research products to try to get rid of some of my scent. Here is an article about what I do. http://www.deerhuntersclub.com/tips/scent-elimination/
I believe this is a pretty decent inexpensive way to help.

I have always had better luck out of a tree stand here in TN so Im usually up a tree to increase my visibility over hunting on the ground. Hunters tag deer every year off the ground. I just do not happen to be one of them.

As far as commercial products i have luck with the following. This is about all I would recommend to a new hunter. Rattling and grunting may run alot of deer off if you dont know what your doing. Spending time in the woods this year will teach you alot more than we can on here. You will learn a ton from observing deer yourself in the woods. Just add on commercial calls whenever you have the funds available. None of them are a must have.
http://www.deerhuntersclub.com/hunt...scents/primos-lil-can-hyper-doe-bleat-review/
During the rut I use this scent on key wicks. http://www.deerhuntersclub.com/hunting-gear/deer-calls-and-scents/golden-estrus-scent-review/

Scout scout scout. Look for deer crap, rubs, tracks, scrapes, trails.. If you need an explanation on any of those let me know. Once you find the sign see if you can figure out why they are using that area. Is it food? Is it for cover? A place to bed down? Cover and a place to bed down for deer is usually the same place. If you can find where they are bedding down and see what trails they are using to go to their feeding areas you have found a good spot to set up. I dont know what your after (big bucks or does) but I would start off with just trying to find a doe to tag.
 

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So if ya'll had a backpack with all the things you'd take with you to the actual field what all would be in it?

I'm assuming besides the rifle of choice, ammunition, extra layers of clothing, the permits/stamps etc., a field dressing kit (knife, bags, gloves, ?), optics of some kind, maybe a basic map of the area and a compass.. what else?

My plan is to go out a week or two before the season starts, find some signs of activity and just find a comfortable place set up shop and wait. The wind that time of year is usually out of the N to NW so Ill be looking for spots south of said activity. What about commercial lures, scents, calls etc. any of it worth my time or should I just stick to my original plan?

Deer – November Firearm Nov. 13
I normally have a day pack for all my hunting excursions, even if they are only a couple hundred yards off a road, if my plan is to take a stand and sit. As you already mentioned, it's a great way to bring additional layers to put on when you get to your planned area, along with other "stuff". It's always advisable to have a compass and or map, as you mentioned and don't forget plenty of water and some snacks, especially if the day gets longer than planned with a late harvest or even perhaps an unforseen slight injury preventing your walking out.

This is also where a cell phone helps and even a GPS to help with giving "rescuers" a location (nothing wrong with being prepared) Of course a simple phone call to a spouse or friend to help you out after a turned ankle would hopefully be all that might ever be required. :thumbup:

In my opinion, the best time to scout is now (weather permitting) through early spring time. Sign from this past season; fresh tracks, bedding areas, scrapes, rubs, trails, etc. should still be easily visible and give you an upper hand on where to look prior to next season. And animals you might see and spook now will be over the encounter rather than risking perhaps spooking them just before the season opener.

Just some things to think about. :yes:
 

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My comments for a new hunter

All the ideas offered have been great, the more time you spend in the woods the more comfortable you will be. It is a great sport that is wonderful even if you never get a shot(I am talking from years where I didn't pull a trigger). I always say that it's a good thing my family doesn't live off what I can catch fishing or shoot hunting. I am a rifle/pistol nut as are many on this forum, and really recommend that you get out to the range and fire as much through your Remington as possible. Also try to use some positions that you will be using in the field not just shooting from sand bags.

Karl
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Sounds good. Its been awhile but I used to spend tons of time out doors when I was younger. I went from stalking squirrels and rabbits with a slingshot out by 9 mile prairie, graduated to an air rifle, and then started plinking with a friends .22 and a 20ga back before I could drive. My parents are not "anti-gun" but they didn't really like the idea of me having one, but I kept bothering them about wanting to go deer hunting sometime and that to be able to make a clean kill and be safe the best way was to just let me get my own. they were still unconvinced, so when my 16th birthday rolled around I said "Look, I'm going to be driving a 4,000lb mass of metal around town, near other people at speeds where a seconds loss of attention could injure or kill anyone around me including myself.... right? Yet having a locked rifle in the house is a bigger concern for you?" I guess i made my point because I got my 710 for my 16th a few weeks later.
 

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Consider getting into reloading..

If you start shooting a lot with your 30-06 it will get expensive. If you have the room for a reloading setup it is easy and fun. It is easy to learn if you have someone step you through it and I find it makes shooting that much more fun. On a crappy day when it is wet and cold, and you wouldn't want to shoot you can always do some reloading.....

Karl
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Sadly the nearest public range is like 45 minutes away to boot, and they charge per hour... I dont know anyone with land out here where I can go unload a few rounds every now and then.
 
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