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This is something I did out west Elk hunting in Idaho, but never find myself doing in the woods of northern Minnesota. Do members usually carry binos on deer hunts or leave them in the truck/at home? We have all been taught never use a scope to look at something, but is there one of us that hasn't? I know that if I had some real lightweight binos I might consider carrying them on deer hunts, my rubber coated Zeiss 8x30s are not very light or compact.

Karl
 

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Do I carry binoculars when I am hunting.....that is like asking me if I carry bullets for my gun.

every time without, a doubt
 

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Since you've hunted out here in the west, you know how important binos are in big open country, but I never go hunting without them. Here's why: because all optics have a plane, or depth of field, they bring objects that are at a specific distance into sharp view. That can be a big help in thick cover when you are trying to spot just an ear, or nose or tail, etc. I look in one direction and slowly move the focusing ring so the sharp plane moves through the various distances (near to far or far to near), then redirect my view a few degrees and repeat the process. I have been able to locate lots of animals by using this technique that I never would have seen with the naked eye... even when the animals were relatively close. So, binos are not just for magnifying at long range, but also for clarifying and defining at short range.
 
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I prefer your other

I prefer your other one. If you have the rifle on you, I don't think you need to worry about kepnieg your 1911 concealed.Any Picture with a 1911 is a good picture.Still I must point out that you quite photogenic no matter the pic or pose.-Weer'd
 

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I carry them on all hunts. I have a pair of 10x50's that are a bit too big and would like to get some 8x42's for the woods. But I always have them.
 

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Has anyone used the bino system that holds them next to your chest. I can't remember what its called. is it worth the money?
 

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Has anyone used the bino system that holds them next to your chest. I can't remember what its called. is it worth the money?
Yes, I have and they work great. The ones I have are made by Crooked Horn and they are called the Slide-Flex System. They stretch a little and slide through rings for a real smooth operation. I tried the strickly stretch ones, made with surgical rubber tubing, but it was too much work getting the glass up to my eyes. Then, the first time I pulled the binos up, but forgot that I hadn't hitched them to the rubber bands, I just about gave myeslf two black eyes. No fooling; I just about laughed my butt off... then got the new system.
 

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By the way, the system that had way too much stretchy action was Bino Buddy. And a tip on using anything that puts the binos on your chest: If you have the habit of carrying your rifle in front of your chest with both hands, you'll have to be careful about scratching it with your binos. I've taken to putting the binos on just before my last layer to avoid that problem. Not sure how you guys in the warmer climates might handle it.
 

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I haven't got a new set yet but 8x42's seem to be a good compromise. I spent about an hour at Cabela's looking through several brands. i thought the 6X30's might be best for archery but I can't afford two so the 8X42 probably will get the nod. I have 7X50 Tasco Marine bino's that I like to keep in the truck just in case. A friend of mine brought them back from the Marines, they have the graduations for verticle/horizional use, something I never needed or figured out.:confused:
 

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Hah, I agree with the quoted statement, partially,.......here ya go


A Mil is a Milliradian, which means it subtends one yard of the circumference of a 1000 yard radius circle, or one metre of a circle of 1000m radius. More practical is to remember a Mil equals 3.6” at 100yds or 10cm at 100m, and increases by 3.6”/10cm for every 100yds/100m of range.

An even more useful thing to remember is that a Mil is half a metre at 500m. Half a metre can be taken as approximating a man’s shoulder width, so if a human figure appears one Mil across they are at 500m. A figure 2 Mils across would be at 250m, a figure ¾ Mil across would be at 750m and a figure ¼ Mil across would be at 2,000m

The idea of the Mildot system is that it acts as a sort of ruler. You look at an object of known size, compare it to the Mildot scale, and then use this formulae to find the range.
Each Mil-dot on a scope reticle is ¼ Mil, the distance between the centres of the dots is 1Mil and the distance between the edges of the dots is ¾ Mil



Range (metres or yards) = [Target size (metres or yards) x 1000] / Size in Mils​

OR

Range (in 1000s of metres or yards) = [Target size (metres or yards)] / Size in Mils​


If a man is assumed to be 6ft (2yds) tall, and appears 5 Mils high, then 2000/5 = 400yds. Distance from belt buckle to crown can be assumed to be half his height, so for the previous example 1000/2.5 = 400yds. When dealing with a 0.5 Mil value it is probably easier to double both figures i.e. treat 2000/2.5 as 4000/5. Likewise quadriple 0.25 and 0.75 values. 1000/3.75 = 4000/15 = 266.7 yards.

Not a complicated formula, but also not one to try and do in your head in the field when under stress. Also, six footers are not average, even in Western Society. Average male height is around 5’ 8” in socks, and female 5’ 3”. 5’ 9” is about 1.9yds, 5’ 6” about 1.8yds and 5’ 3” 1.75yds. This makes the maths a little harder to do in your head.

My solution –have a cheat sheet.



You may not agree with the features I’ve selected, or the dimensions may be off for the targets you are likely to encounter. The average height of someone in Asia probably is quite a bit less than 5’9”.
To allow for this the cheat sheet is an Excel document with embedded formulae. All you have to do is decide the size of the object you want to use as a reference, and divide this by the number of inches or cms per Mil at 100yrds, or 100m, depending on which units you are using. These figures are found in cells B2 and B3.

For example:-


11” long rabbit. 11/3.6 =3.06 Mil at 100yds


75 cm high target 75/10 = 7.5 Mil at 100m

Once you have this Mil value, enter it into B10-16 on either the Yards or Metres sheet (make sure you have not calculated the size at 100yds if you are using the Metres sheet). When you enter this value the sheet will calculate the rest of the table automatically. B15 and B16 have been left blank so you can add your own values.

It may also be possible to create a nomograph so that you can place a straight edge between the column for the object actual size and that for the size in Mils and read off the range. However, the on-line nomograph drawing programs I have tried have not given me anything comprehensible.



There is another way to use the Millirad system. Hold your arm out straight, elbow locked, palm up with one or more fingers raised.
Look at the finger with one eye closed.
The width of your first finger is approximately 30 Mils, the first and second fingers together 70 Mils, three fingers 100 Mils and four fingers 125 Mils.
This method is most useful for large objects such as vehicles. A tank can be assumed to be 10 feet wide and 20 feet long. 30 Mils is equivalent to 10ft at 100 metres.






Much simpler is to estimate the target's speed in Metres per second in the first place. Bear in mind that an estimate is exactly that, and does not need to be to four decimal places accuracy. Estimate the speed in metres. If you need to treat a foot of movement as 0.3 or a third of a metre, two foot as 0.6 or two thirds and so on. Not a mathematically accurate equivalent but close enough for these purposes.

Another good tip is to start thinking of you bullet flight times as fractions rather than decimals. Most of us find it far easier to multiply the target speed by a half or 3/10ths than by 0.5 or 0.3. For a fraction of 10 the trick is simple:-multiply by the top number and then knock a zero off the result (move the decimal point one to the left).

A target is estimated moving at 1.6m/s and the time of flight for that range is 0.4 sec?

1.6 x 4 = 6.4

6.4 divided by 10 is 0.64

Lead is therefore 0.64 metres, which is about 2/3rds of a yard or 2 ft.

If you can observe the target through a Mil-dot scale you can do things even quicker. Place the crosshairs on the target and count one second (“one thousand and one”). Note how far along the Mil scale the target moved and multiply by the fractional bullet time of flight to get the lead in Mils.

Example, a target moves 4 Mils at second. TOF is 4/10ths.

4 x 4 = 16

16 divided by 10 is 1.6 Mils.

Aim a shade over a Mil and a half ahead of the target.


QUOTE=Hunting Man;40491]I haven't got a new set yet but 8x42's seem to be a good compromise. I spent about an hour at Cabela's looking through several brands. i thought the 6X30's might be best for archery but I can't afford two so the 8X42 probably will get the nod. I have 7X50 Tasco Marine bino's that I like to keep in the truck just in case. A friend of mine brought them back from the Marines, they have the graduations for verticle/horizional use, something I never needed or figured out.:confused:[/QUOTE]
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Carrying binos in the field

I got out of the habit after putting some small dents in the top of the butt stock on my Ruger No 1 during my first Elk hunt. I had no problem when walking, but in Idaho it seemed like we were always going up (yea I know it's impossible to always be going up). My binos would start swinging then bonk into the butt stock. That was a great justification by onehorse for carrying them on MN hunts I never have tried the shifting focus technique, but I will now. I always thought that unless I was counting points as a trophy hunter I didn't need them in the woods here in MN. I become focused on whether I have a unobstructed shot into the boiler room if I see horns. I personally love my Zeiss 8x30 armored binos but they are a little heavy, I haven't tried one of the chest attachment systems. Thanks again for the input everyone....

Karl
 
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thats was a pretty good idea with the changing focus trick. i'll be using that one myself. i normally just try for a better look at what normally turns out to be a shadow change or to search the source of a noise.
 

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smackabuck, I'm going to have to read that post very slowly again, but I think I get the just of what you are saying. Range can be figured using fairly known objects or so. A cheat sheet would be a great thing and I could have it in the truck and see if I can guesstimate distance using the mil markings. I kinda had a thought what they were used for but never had them explained to me. New lazer rangefinders have probably made these obsolete. Thanks.
 
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if i'm reading all the verbiage right you can do the same thing with a variable power scope with duplex reticules to get a range on the target
 

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Yep it is the same thing and you accomplish the same end. I was just explaining how to use them. I, like hunting man, prefer the laser range finder. I learned the other when I was in the service. but I will say this, I was hunting and my rangefinder went kaput, who cares right, well I had a rather large fallow buck come out and I was able to revert to the old tried and true method of using the mil dot graduations to ESTIMATE the distance and therefore was able to judge the antler size fairly well. It also told me how many clicks to add my elevation to make a clean harvest
if i'm reading all the verbiage right you can do the same thing with a variable power scope with duplex reticules to get a range on the target
 

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If you are interested in a quick and easy way of estimating long range shots at game, you might want to take a look at "How to Determine the Distance of Long Range Shots" in my article on Long Range Shooting. You'll find it on the Team DHC section of this site. It's easy, fun to set up, and it works.
 

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preciate it sir and I will check it out but from my days as a scout/sniper in the corps and being on the national shooting team, i am pretty well versed in usung the mil dot graduations
 

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preciate it sir and I will check it out but from my days as a scout/sniper in the corps and being on the national shooting team, i am pretty well versed in usung the mil dot graduations
Sounds like you have more knowledge and experience than most of us. Hope this didn't sound like I was doubting that. I just posted this suggestion for anyone who cared to check it out as it is quite simple and very effective.
 
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