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post #1 of 35 (permalink) Old 12-11-2012, 03:29 AM Thread Starter
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Too Much Gun?

After my most recent trip to the firing range to get a feel for the 45-70, after having owned and fired a 30-30 on numerous occasions, I noted that at the last mili-second, when I squeeze the trigger on it, I close my eyes.

The kick is definitely stronger (after all, its 300+ grains worth) than the 30-30.

I'll need a gun with this caliber for Moose, but I am tempted to say it is too much gun for "me."

For those who have been watching what I post in here, you know that I'm not "new" to guns, but I AM new to hunting, and am planning my first hunt in 2013. This gives me time to get familiar, comfortable and accurate with the 45-70, before entering the woods.

That said, are there any pointers you could offer, that would help me with the anticipation of the kick, control of the high caliber gun I'm shooting, and avoiding the temptation to close my eyes (lol).

Also, for those of you who are watching them, I'm up to my 5th video (in progress) in my chronicling of my journey to my first hunt. The next one due out soon, is about the gear choices I've made.

Here's the first video in the series:
So You Want To Be A Hunter, Part 1 - YouTube


-Soupy1957

"If the river sounds; somethings coming"
-annonymous
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post #2 of 35 (permalink) Old 12-11-2012, 06:46 AM
 
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well soupy1957, I like this part 1 video, I think it's a good personal documentary to share with others who might be interested in becoming hunters as well.


So far, I didn't hear any mention of the courteous hunters and genuine sportsman here at the Deer Hunters Club who share their wisdom with you
on their many many years of hunting, trapping & shooting knowledge.
offering you their best advice to guide you on your safest most successful hunting journey possible ,

J/K, I think you're doing a good job based on what I've seen in part 1
Good Luck and happy safe hunting always...

Democracy is two wolves and a lamb voting on what to have for lunch.
Liberty is a well-armed lamb contesting the outcome of the vote.
-Benjamin Franklin

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post #3 of 35 (permalink) Old 12-11-2012, 08:39 AM
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I strongly believe that the more you shoot the less you will close your eye. It's all about practice.

James 1:2-8
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post #4 of 35 (permalink) Old 12-11-2012, 12:09 PM
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I agree with Tator , can't get enough practice.
And what I like to do that helps me shoot constantly is focus on the aiming not the shot, I mean when I'm going to shoot I don't just throw up the gun, put cross hair on spot n fire. I raise n aim, take a deep breath and while focused on my sights slowly exhaling that breath ( helps even more with steadiness) and all in the mean time I'm adding more n more pressure to the trigger.
Even though I know I'm shooting and it's all happing in a few seconds but the actual shot is a surprise because of my Focus on the sights and the slow adding pressure to the trigger.
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post #5 of 35 (permalink) Old 12-11-2012, 03:49 PM Thread Starter
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I've received some advice to move the Scope forward further, rather than adjusting my head. I'm looking into that.

Also, "thanks" to one and all, for your kind words and good advice. I have all this winter and next spring and summer to get familiar with the 45-70 well enough to get a close cluster and better control.

-Soupy1957

"If the river sounds; somethings coming"
-annonymous
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post #6 of 35 (permalink) Old 12-12-2012, 11:01 AM
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in the army they stress over and over and over again to control your breathing. That's where I really learned to control it. It's true, you will shoot 100% better if you control it. Plus, when deer hunting, your adrenaline is pumping so to get your heart rate under control AND your breathing under control can sometimes be a task in itself.

James 1:2-8
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post #7 of 35 (permalink) Old 12-12-2012, 11:12 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tator View Post
I strongly believe that the more you shoot the less you will close your eye. It's all about practice.
Quote:
Originally Posted by on_the_fly View Post
I agree with Tator , can't get enough practice.
Agreed, but once you develop that habit or a flinch, it's hard to cure. You need to practice without ammo (use snap-caps) until you get over that "expectation" of the recoil. Once the hammer let-off becomes a surprise, you'll flinch or close your eyes too late to affect your accuracy.

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post #8 of 35 (permalink) Old 12-12-2012, 11:32 AM
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Over gunned, we use to call it the magnum craze. If you can't shoot it comfortably you'll never shoot it well. There is a big difference between managed heavy recoil and simply being over gunned and flinching.
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post #9 of 35 (permalink) Old 12-13-2012, 11:20 AM Thread Starter
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"in the army they stress over and over and over again to control your breathing."

Is it like the training I had in photography, where we were taught to take a deep breath and hold it, before snapping the picture?

P.S.: What are Snap Caps? Educate me.

-Soupy1957

"If the river sounds; somethings coming"
-annonymous
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post #10 of 35 (permalink) Old 12-13-2012, 10:14 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by soupy1957 View Post
"in the army they stress over and over and over again to control your breathing."

Is it like the training I had in photography, where we were taught to take a deep breath and hold it, before snapping the picture?

P.S.: What are Snap Caps? Educate me.

-Soupy1957
A snap cap is a device which appears similar to a standard firearm cartridge but contains no primer or projectile and is used to ensure that dry firing firearms of certain designs does not cause damage. Snap caps contain a spring-damped false primer which absorbs the force from the firing pin, allowing the user to safely test the function of the firearm without damaging the components of the firearm.
A small number of rimfire and centerfire weapons of older design should not be test-fired with the chamber empty, as this can lead to weakening and possible breakage of the firing pin and increased wear to other components in those firearms. In the instance of a rimfire weapon of primitive design, "dry firing" can also cause deformation of the chamber edge. For this reason some shooters use a snap cap in an attempt to cushion the weapon's firing pin as it moves forward.

A pair of 12 gauge snap caps


Snap caps and action-proving dummy cartridges also have usage as a training tool to replace live rounds for loading and unloading drills, as well as training for mis-fires or "jams", as they function identically to a live "dud" round that has not ignited
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