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Old 03-16-2012, 08:22 PM
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3. LENGTH of Main Beam: (Fig. 2) First, it is necessary to determine the main beams and their tips. The main beams are usually easy to identify in white-tailed deer, because they will end at the rear most points; however, some non-typical antlers may have more than one projection at the end of the beam. If so, choose the one that appears to be the logical beam tip because of its contour, size and location. Measure the length of each main antler beam from the bottom edge of the burr (or coronet) to the tip. If a beam tip is broken so that its far point is not on the line of measurement, it should be carded off. The measurement follows the center of the antler's outer curve and is essentially parallel to the longitudinal blood grooves. Begin the measurement where the center-line of the outer curve intersects the bottom edge of the burr. This will be on the side of the head and behind the eye, not in front on the forehead.

4. LENGTH OF TYPICAL TINES: (Fig. 3)
Even though in this method all tines are measured and included in the score , it still is necessary to identify the typical tines, because the beam circumferences must be measured between
typical tines, disregarding any non-typical tines that may be present. Measure the length of each valid typical tine on each antler. If a tine is broken so that its far point is not on the line of measurement, it should be carded off. A valid tine must be at least 1 inch long, and no wider than its length. A typical tine is one that grows in the typical location and manner. Be sure not to measure the tip of the main beam as a tine. While the beam tip is always a typical point, it is not a tine, and its length is already included in the length of the main beam. Each typical tine on white-tailed deer antlers has a specific identification number: T-l, T-2, T-3, etc., as illustrated. Record its length on the proper line on the entry form. Any typical tines that are missing are to be identified by a zero. There is no set limit to the number of typical tines that can grow on a white-tailed deer antler however, it is unlikely to exceed six or seven. To be considered typical, a tine must grow in a typical manner and location, and form the typical pattern for that species. A typical brow tine (T-l), if present, must grow upward from the top of the beam and not from the side or bottom of the beam, or from the burr. The other typical tines must grow upward from the beam in typical fashion, not from the side or bottom of the beam, or from another tine. In white-tailed deer, only one tine (not both) of a double brow tine may be treated as typi-cal (normally the longer one), the other being non-typical. However, both tines of a double tine growing elsewhere on the main beam can be typical in some cases.

5. LENGTH OF NON-TYPICAL TINES
(Fig. 4)
Measure the length of each valid non-typical tine
on each antler. If a tine is broken so that its far
point is not on the line of measurement, it should be carded off. A valid tine must be at least one
inch long, and no wider than its length. Non-typical tines are those that do not qualify as typical.
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